Farmlink – Rise of health- conscious consumer part 1

At the start of every year, we enter the prediction season and just about everybody who has a voice in the global food and beverage industry, has had his or her say on what can be expected for this industry. Although the food and beverage industry is unpredictable as ever,Farmlink selected from amongst these predictions what we regard as the top seven food and beverage trends for 2013. The first and probably main trend (which comes as no surprise) is naturalness — the theme for 2013 seems to be natural and healthy, as most of the other trends can be traced back to the core motivation of health-consciousness based on naturalness.

Natural The dominating natural trend of 2012 will continue to grow in 2013. The growing belief that everything that is artificially added to food is evil, is motivating more and more consumers to choose additive, colourantand preservative-free food. Manufacturers are keen to meet this demand, as moving in the natural direction often implies moving in the direction of the more affluent consumer group. The effect of this trend is clearly visible in the sweetener market, where consumer preference is for sweete ners that are both low- or zero-calorie and naturally trump the preference of longestablished zero-calorie products such as aspartame. The natural trend is mainly supported by increased health-consciousness. A report by Kampffmeyer Food Innovation found that 74% of people surveyed thought that “natural” meant “healthier”, illustrating clearly just how strongly the idea of naturalness is connected to healthier products in the minds of consumers. In health foods the focus is shifting from numbers — that is amount of calories, fat percentage, etc — in nutritional information towards simplicity of ingredients. Consumers are increasingly looking for simple, even old-fashioned, ingredients often traditionally associated with good quality.

Functional Functional foods have become extremely popular as more products carry the promise of medicinal value. This trend will persist in 2013 as more consumers, when choosing, for example, a fruit juice, will opt for the juice that promises to boost your immune system, aid digestion or even make you happy. If a product conveys a proven message of having a natural and intrinsic health benefit, it becomes increasingly easy to sell. Functional foods often focus on weight
loss, digestive health, mood elevation and the immune system. Some of the top functional foods for 2013 are the insulin-mimicking ingre-dient emu/in, pectins that inhibit a protein called galectin-3, which is associated with a higher risk of heart failure, and Zembrin, the first patented, standardised and clinically studied extract of Sceletium tortuosum, a succulent plant known by the San people of South Africa as kanna, and which has been shown to boost mental acuity and elevate mood. Linked to the idea of functional foods is the concept of eating food or drinking a beverage that will give you more energy than normal food products do. This trend is dominated by the energy drink industry and is fed by the increasingly rushed nature of lifestyles around the globe. More and more stressed executives or worn-out moms are looking for a kick-start to immediately dismiss their lack of energy.

Healthy snacking In an attempt to balance a natural human love for food with increased health consciousness, healthy snacking ha ..ecome a trend to watch. Nuts are on, .f the foods reaping great benefits fr. his trend. The Wonderful Pistachios , .nd in the USA has become one of the .st successful healthy snack launches o the last decade. Retail sales grew from zero to more than 400-million dollars from 2008 to 2012. The trend of healthy snacking closely links to functional foods as many consumers would, for example, now choose a low-calorie granola bar that aids digestive health over a chocolate. Kellogg’s is planning the launch of a new nutri-grain product, a granola bar made up of 20g whole grain and fruit —an example of a perfect answer to the demand for healthy snacking. Innovative, convenient, natural and healthy seems to be the way to go for snack manufacturers worldwide.

At the start of every year, we enter the prediction season and just about everybody who has a voice in the global food and beverage industry, has had his or her say on what can be expected for this industry. Although the food and beverage industry is unpredictable as ever,Farmlink selected from amongst these predictions what we regard as the top seven food and beverage trends for 2013. The first and probably main trend (which comes as no surprise) is naturalness — the theme for 2013 seems to be natural and healthy, as most of the other trends can be traced back to the core motivation of health-consciousness based on naturalness.

Natural The dominating natural trend of 2012 will continue to grow in 2013. The growing belief that everything that is artificially added to food is evil, is motivating more and more consumers to choose additive, colourantand preservative-free food. Manufacturers are keen to meet this demand, as moving in the natural direction often implies moving in the direction of the more affluent consumer group. The effect of this trend is clearly visible in the sweetener market, where consumer preference is for sweete ners that are both low- or zero-calorie and naturally trump the preference of longestablished zero-calorie products such as aspartame. The natural trend is mainly supported by increased health-consciousness. A report by Kampffmeyer Food Innovation found that 74% of people surveyed thought that “natural” meant “healthier”, illustrating clearly just how strongly the idea of naturalness is connected to healthier products in the minds of consumers. In health foods the focus is shifting from numbers — that is amount of calories, fat percentage, etc — in nutritional information towards simplicity of ingredients. Consumers are increasingly looking for simple, even old-fashioned, ingredients often traditionally associated with good quality.

Functional Functional foods have become extremely popular as more products carry the promise of medicinal value. This trend will persist in 2013 as more consumers, when choosing, for example, a fruit juice, will opt for the juice that promises to boost your immune system, aid digestion or even make you happy. If a product conveys a proven message of having a natural and intrinsic health benefit, it becomes increasingly easy to sell. Functional foods often focus on weight loss, digestive health, mood elevation and the immune system. Some of the top functional foods for 2013 are the insulin-mimicking ingre-dient emu/in, pectins that inhibit a protein called galectin-3, which is associated with a higher risk of heart failure, and Zembrin, the first patented, standardised and clinically studied extract of Sceletium tortuosum, a succulent plant known by the San people of South Africa as kanna, and which has been shown to boost mental acuity and elevate mood. Linked to the idea of functional foods is the concept of eating food or drinking a beverage that will give you more energy than normal food products do. This trend is dominated by the energy drink industry and is fed by the increasingly rushed nature of lifestyles around the globe. More and more stressed executives or worn-out moms are looking for a kick-start to immediately dismiss their lack of energy.

Healthy snacking In an attempt to balance a natural human love for food with increased health consciousness, healthy snacking ha ..ecome a trend to watch. Nuts are on, .f the foods reaping great benefits fr. his trend. The Wonderful Pistachios , .nd in the USA has become one of the .st successful healthy snack launches o the last decade. Retail sales grew from zero to more than 400-million dollars from 2008 to 2012. The trend of healthy snacking closely links to functional foods as many consumers would, for example,

1-May-2013---Farmlink---2When it comes to healthy snacking, the trusty nut leads the way.
Whole and gluten-free With food experts increasingly dooming refined carbohydrates, the popularity of the wholegrain is booming. In the USA, this trend is supported by regulations requiring food served as school lunches to be “wholegrain rich”. More and more manufacturers will start to look at increasing their production of wholegrain products as consumer demand increases. Especially wholegrain that is high in fibre, protein, vitamins and minerals, and in many cases also gluten-free, is the true super-grains behind this trend, as it is becoming increasingly popular and is put to work in increasingly innovative ways. Gluten-free products experienced immense growth in 2012 and according to trend predictors, the popularity and use of gluten-free products will continue to rise. Asked why they buy gluten-free products in a Packaged Facts consumer survey in August 2012, 35% of the respondents said gluten-free products are generally healthier, 27% said they used it “to manage my weight”, 21% said gluten-free products are generally low-carb and 15% said a member of the household has a gluten or wheat intolerance. Only 7% said they were buying gluten-free due to a household member having celiac disease. Indeed, according to Packaged Facts: “The conviction that glutenfree products are generally healthier is the top motivation for the purchase of these products!’

Innovation The president of US snacks at Kellogg’s, Todd Penegor, said the following about the role of innovation in 2013: “Innovation is the life lead of snacks. We never really slowed down in innovation in snacks and when we look at 2013,a lot more innovation is coming to fuel growth!” Innovation will not only be the way to go in snack manufacturing, but in most aspects of food manufacturing. This may be a comment on the human psyche, but more and more consumers are opting to leave the tra Functional foods with health and digestive properties are gaining popularity amongst consumers.
ditional, and in their eyes often boring, behind to reach for new, exciting and sometimes even risky food choices.

Muscle and protein Strong and skinny seems to be the look for 2013 as more and more consumers from all age groups look to maintain lean muscle mass as part of an active and healthy lifestyle. This trend is not only motivating the sales of protein foods, but also of healthy protein supplements. The use of protein supplements is no longer limited to Mr Strong — everyone, male and female alike, now wants to be able to utilise their athletic ability through lean power.

economic downturn and will continue to do so as more product labels indicate that the product was manufactured keeping in mind higher standards of welfare, provenance and biodiversity. However, there are limits to this trend. Most consumers will choose an ethics-compliant product, as long as it suits their pockets. A Belgian study on consumers’willingness to pay for ethics found that the average premium that consumers are willing to pay for ethical compliancy is 10%. If the premium goes above that limit, most consumers, depending on their financial status, will start to doubt the importance of ethical trade.

South African trends The 2013 predicted trends were mostly made with the global food and beverage industry in mind, but only time will tell what the industry will look like in South Africa, how many of these trends will be seen on the South African stage and what their impact will be. Global trends usually find their way to our shores quickly. d
Fair Trade Are consumers willing to pay for ethics? The answer is yes, increasingly so, but only up to a certain amount. Sales of Fair Trade foods have continued to rise throughout the global

AUTUMN 2013
FARMLINK

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